Title

Whither the Roots? Achieving Conceptual Depth in Psychology of Religion

Publication Date

2008

Abstract

Should psychology of religion undergo a disciplinary renaissance and, if so, what might it look like? In this paper we explore that question by discussing the benefits of a better grounding of the field within mid-level theories from general psychology that provide it with greater conceptual depth. Such discussion will focus on three already existing and variously productive lines of research as case studies: attribution processes, attachment styles, and religious coping. These case studies represent lines of research at three developmental stages: 1) infancy, with little visible return but with signs of promise (attribution), 2) adolescence, with dividends already yielded but also with promise not yet fully realized (attachment), and 3) maturity, where a fruitful harvest has already been experienced but yet without decline (coping). Regardless of developmental position, it is argued that research in psychology of religion will be enhanced to the extent that it achieves conceptual depth by being framed in terms of mid-level theories.

Keywords

Attribution (Social psychology); Attachment behavior

Publication Title

Archive for the Psychology of Religion

Volume

30

Issue

1

First Page

19

Last Page

35

DOI of Published Version

10.1163/157361208X316944

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